Hab-it Exercises Forums Ask Tasha! Power Yoga Flow

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  • #75751
    Willow
    Guest

    Hi Tasha

    I have been diagnosed with a rectocele and cystocele both of which developed after the birth of my first child 3 months ago, just before my 40th birthday. I have a genetic collagen defect, meaning I have stretchy collagen. I am told both ‘celes are mild. However, the rectocele is very symptomatic and I have a lot of discomfort when I bend over forwards to pick something up off the ground, which I think might be the cystocele? I have been doing physio for 2 months and recently purchased your DVD. Before delivery I was a very keen yoga enthusiast and absolutely loved power flow yoga, involving lots of vinyasas (jumping back to plank, down to chaturanga and then to upwards facing dog etc. I also loved arm balances, such as crow, side crow and split leg arm balance. I just wondered whether you think, subject to my being able to rehab my prolapses sufficiently/ having surgery if not, whether I will ever be able to safely practice vinyasa flow and arm balances again? If so, do you have any tips for how to do so safely?

    Many thanks

    Yolande

    #75782
    Tasha
    Keymaster

    Willow,
    I know the breath is very important in Yoga so you should be okay on this, but as you work your way back, your guide will be absolutely no short breath holds as you move through more difficult moves. If a stretch or strength hold is beyond a comfortable ability for some, there will be a short breath hold, and this can not happen. So stay within your ability to perform with even breath and we are good!

    Tasha

    #75784
    Willow
    Guest

    Thanks so much for your reply Tasha. That’s such a relief; I was feeling really down about having to switch down my yoga practice. I’ll make sure I work slowly back up to my former level.

    Would you mind if I also asked your views on gardening (I’m a qualified gardener) and mountain biking. When off road biking I always use a bike with either suspension forks (a hardtail) or full suspension (front and back suspension). Would the latter be safer from now on? Also, do you think in time going back to bouncing down boulder strewn hills will be a possibility? I normally have to do this with my bottom off the saddle for balance, and with knees flexed. I used to be an endurance mountain bike athlete and had competed at both national and international events and would love to be able to get back to this too. Also, I loved climbing back up the hills too. I always remained seated on the way up, but would often push quite high gears. Will this need to be altered at all?

    Lastly, in gardening, I have been told by a gynae to give it up, but I have a 200ft garden that I love. I don’t have to work as a professional gardener, so can set that dream aside, but what about digging holes in my own garden to plant plants? I’m not talking trenches, but 2ft by 2ft type holes? Also, how about lifting 25 litre bags of compost? Or should I be looking at breaking that down into 2 smaller bags for example? I can always get my partner to do some of the bigger holes/lug the heavy plants, but I would like to be able to carry on with mowing the lawn, pruning and planting, as the garden is my baby. Is doing the above realistic? Sorry for all of the questions, just trying to get my head around what’s a realistic level that I should be hoping/aiming for. I have always been such an active person and this diagnosis has really knocked me for 6.

    Thanks in advance for any further thoughts and for helping so many women like me.

    #76119
    Tasha
    Keymaster

    Yes to all of that Willow. Mountain biking keeps you in the perfect position with triceps engaged, TA drawn tight, tail bone lifted. Go for it!

    And gardening. Get on your hands and knees – perfect workout position – and this is great for you! No problem digging or carrying bags – (I have built boulder walls 🙂 Just ease into all these activities with gradual strength gains, paying attention to your breath and TA activation. Take note if a specific activity increases your symptoms and find out why – is it your breath, is it form?

    The biggest thing for you to remember is that you have to ensure you have each individual muscle of your pelvic basket firing efficiently. That is the purpose of the Hab It dvd – be sure you are connecting with each muscle. Then a progression to the advanced programs ensures that these muscles are firing in a co-contraction and that your firing pattern is set with your deepest core stabilizers firing ahead of your bigger muscles over the top. Don’t skip steps!!!

    Also, read through the entire Education section. A lot to learn, a lot to be aware of. Your goals are big and I have no worries that they are attainable.

    tasha

    #76743
    Willow
    Guest

    Sorry for the delay; I’ve been on holiday and just got back, but thanks so much for your detailed and inspiring replies.

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