Hab-it Exercises Forums Ask Tasha! I want my old body back

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  • #50022
    Lauren
    Guest

    Hi Tasha
    Hoping you can help, I’ve just had my 3rd child and I’m 8weeks postpartum. I had a natural birth with no tearing, stitching or scaring. But this baby only took 7mins from first push to last so traumatic in that sense. I’ve been diagnosed with a rectocele (what grade I’m unsure) but when constipated it’s very prominent at the edge of my vaginal opening. I have to wait for my 6week check (booked in tomorrow) with the doc and I’m going to request to be referred to physio. However the doctor was very dismissive of my problem just saying do my kegals, but it’s really harming me mentally. Is this something I’ve got to deal with for the rest of my life? I can’t see it just going away. I’ve been doing my kegals and taking medicine for my constipation but I now also believe I’ve got a cystocele as I have a bulge on top of the rectocele. I’m exclusively breastfeeding, so when I stop will that make any difference of am I getting my hopes up? Hoping the constipation will go. I don’t drive and have to walk 4/5 miles min a day on the school runs, is this a good or bad thing? Hope you can advice

    #50091
    Hayley
    Guest

    Hang in there Lauren! I discovered a rectocele at 5 weeks pp when I looked with a mirror to check my stitches. It was always visible from the outside. My first physio said kegels but I searched for a better one because I knew from things I’d read I was probably hypertonic in my pelvic floor (too tight). This forum and Tasha highlighted that rectoceles are often more related to having a tight pelvic floor rather than weak. After a few weeks of physical therapy it was visibly gone. We did a lot of release work before I was allowed t do kegels (which are bad for a tight PF). Hang in there, there is so much hope!

    #50745
    Tasha
    Keymaster

    Those are great thoughts Hayley and right on track. Lauren, you are not alone on the feelings of shock, fear, and being alone in this. Please know that you are not – some urogyns go as far as saying every woman will have some type of pelvic floor dysfunction at some point in their life. Yours has shown itself now – so its time to learn all about your pelvic and abdominal muscles. Your goal is to develop a deep understanding of each muscle that can contribute to pelvic support, understand how to find and hold neutral spine posture, and understand that you can control the pressure within your abdominal cavity through muscle activation and breath.

    So read, read, read the Educate Yourself section. You can begin with the Pelvic Floor muscle spasms to understand the effects of hypertone in the pelvic floor and how this can often relate to rectoceles. If you fall into this category, then Hayley is right, you may want to avoid Kegels if they tense the muscles and those muscles can’t relax. You will want to educate yourself on relaxation of these muscles and focus on strengthening of all of the other muscles of your pelvic basket.

    Let me assure you – you will be find. You will someday be like Hayley, on here, reassuring another mom 🙂
    Now start your journey of educating yourself and find that neutral spine posture!

    Tasha

    #51816
    Lauren
    Guest

    Thanks for getting back to me, I’ve received the hab-it DVD and just did my first workout. I do have a question, my bulge now feels more pronounced after doing it. is that normal or is my posture all wrong? If feels like it does towards the end of the day and it was only 8.30 in the morning. When I originally messaged my main concern was my rectocele but now it’s the bulge I feel towards the front which is most bothersome. Still waiting for my referral to the women’s health physio therapist who can hopefully give me clear diagnosis but I’m just looking for a little reassurance to carry on even if it does feel more obvious. Also what’s your opinion on the breastfeeding side of it, will I not feel the full benefits of recovery until I stop and hormone levels return to normal?

    Many thanks
    Lauren

    #52150
    Tasha
    Keymaster

    Lauren,
    Hopefully you have been reading through the Educate Yourself section to gain a thorough understanding of the power of your breath – to use as a vacuum, lifting pressure off of your pelvic floor with rib elevation and expansion vs. diaphragmatic breathing. Hopefully you have a true understanding of the difference between a Transversus abdominus contraction that will lift pressure off of your pelvic floor vs the Rectus Abdominus contraction that will force pressure down on your pelvic floor.

    I would not expect you to have increased symptoms after workout 1, so focus on the highlights I have stated above to be sure you are truly dialed into your muscles and pressure distribution within your pelvic-abdominal cavity.

    As far as breast feeding, it does keep your levels of progesterone higher, therefore can leave tissues a bit more lax. You can expect improvement following cessation of breast feeding but it won’t be a dramatic improvement – your biggest impact comes from true control of posture, muscles recruitment, and breath!

    tasha

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